It’s a Llama!

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It’s a little llama that jumps when you pull his strings. This design is meant to be a build-it-yourself kit for making an ornament. The pieces all snap together and string can be added to hang it and create the frolicking motion.There are 11 pieces altogether, not including the string, that you can print in any color combination you want.

All of the STL files for printing one are available on Thingiverse here.

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This llama was created as a part of a series that I like to refer to as my mildly mechanical designs. I like the idea of making things that incorporate one or two basic engineering principles. I think of these designs as way to teach myself how to use these principles, as well as a way to show others how they work.

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Atlanta Maker Faire 2015

This month, I participated in the Atlanta Maker Faire again as part of Oscar Eastwood (i.e. The Society of Lady Makers). With rain looming, we were a little concerned about the turn out, but everything worked out great. We had a blast helping kids make miniature light-up houses, lighthouses, and critter pins.

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Some of our critter magnets, and the sign for our letter writing workshop.

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A few more of our critter magnets (in 3D printed wood), and a little bit of our workspace.

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This year we had a few of our zen gardens and 3D scanned designs on display for kids to play with(in). I love the way the colors looked all together.

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Again this year the hot glue gun was key. We even found some great glittery gold glue to use for magnet making.

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This year we even had a tropical bird weathering the storm with us at our booth.

All in all it was a great experience to see kids get excited about making. We had a few repeat visitors from last year and it was neat to hear about how they ended up using their creations after the Faire. I learned a lot about what level of detail children are interesting in learning about, and how to keep my instructions short and sweet.

Fish Charms

Hook a fish. The hook comes out of its mouth with a little wiggling. The tail also flaps around. I love using 3-D printing to make things that are mildly mechanical and would be a pain to make by any other method. I think this little guy is destined for a brighter colors and a smoother texture.

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Sea Turtle Puppet

Growing up I had a series of Wizard of Oz figurines that would move their arms and legs if you on pulled their strings. This is a version of that design where you use a downward pulling motion to cause the flippers to flap. The beauty of 3-D printing is that you can print the whole thing in one go with the chain already attached.  You could also easily replace the links with string if wanted to improve durability.

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Silicone & Sensor Project

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This project was a design concept for a wound trainer. The end product would be a silicone wound with an internal sensor. This was an early concept which has since been redesigned based on user feedback. This image is of the mechanical enclosure for the hardware.
sensormount
Touch sensor mount with silicone keys.
topbottom2
Top panel with switch and LED mounts.
components
3-D printed pieces.
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Assembled prototype.

Remote Control

Completely 3-D printed. Bumpers  have a softer durometer and flex around corners.
Completely 3-D printed. Bumpers have a softer durometer and flex around corners.

Project I did for work.  It is used as a controller for a robot body. Modeled in Solidworks.

Capacitive touch buttons and a joystick control movement through the screens.
Capacitive touch buttons and a joystick control movement through the screens.
Clam shell design with rubber bumpers. Insert snaps in behind battery connections.
Clam shell design with rubber bumpers. Insert snaps in behind battery connections.